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Fiction - Science Fiction and Fantasy

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These are novels and novellas in the Science Fiction and Fantasy genre that are best-sellers, award winners or otherwise significant. As a guideline, a maximum of six books from any author are included unless there are very good reasons for including more. More Science Fiction and Fantasy Works can be found in Nebula Awards and Hugo Awards

122 facts:

Aldous Huxley
   wrote   
Brave New World
1932. Dystopian novel set in London in 2540. The book was banned in Ireland in 1932. Received the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award of Merit
Aldous Huxley
   wrote   
Island
1962. The final book by Huxley. It is the account of Will Farnaby, a cynical journalist who is shipwrecked on the fictional island of Pala. Island is Huxley's utopian counterpart to his most famous work 'Brave New World'.
Anne McCaffrey
   wrote   
Damia’s Children
3rd volume in best-selling Tower & Hive series. The Science Fiction Book Club Book of the Year Award. In total McCaffery has won 8 of these awards as of 2009.
Anne McCaffrey
   wrote   
Dragonflight
1968. Best-selling novel which is part of the Dragonrider’s of Pern® series of novels. 'Weyr Search', which was later incorporated into 'Dragonflight', won a Hugo Award for best novella. McCaffrey thus became the first woman to win a Hugo for fiction. A Nebula award went to the novella 'Dragonriders' which was also incorporated into 'Dragonflight'.
Anne McCaffrey
   wrote   
Freedom's Choice
Freedom series. Barnes & Noble Award
Anne McCaffrey
   wrote   
Killashandra
2nd volume of the best-selling Crystal Singer series. The Science Fiction Book Club Book of the Year Award
Anne McCaffrey & Mercedes Lackey
   wrote   
The Ship Who Searched
This novel set in a McCaffrey's universe where interstellar ships are operated by the living personalities of human beings, and tells the tale of a paralyzed girl and her "shipmate" Alex as they discover a mystery - and search out its secret.
Anne McCaffrey
   wrote   
The Rowan
1990. The first in the best-selling Rowan series. 'The Rowan' was a New York Times bestseller.
Anne McCaffrey
   wrote   
The White Dragon
1978. Best-selling novel which is part of the Dragonrider’s of Pern® series of novels. Won numerous awards incl. the Gandalf Award.
Arthur C. Clarke
   wrote   
2001: A Space Odyssey
1960. Made into a well-known movie direated by Stanley Kubrik.
Arthur C. Clarke
   wrote   
2010: Odyssey Two
1982. A best-seller, it is the sequel to 2001: A Space Odyssey and was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1983
Arthur C. Clarke
   wrote   
A Fall of Moondust
1961. It was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Novel, and was the first science fiction novel selected to become a Reader's Digest Condensed Book.
Arthur C. Clarke
   wrote   
The Fountains of Paradise
1979 Winner, Nebula Award for Best Novel and Hugo Award.
Arthur C. Clarke
   wrote   
A Meeting With Medusa
Nebula Award for best novella 1972
Arthur C. Clarke
   wrote   
Rendezvous With Rama
Sci Fi. nebula Award, Hugo Award, Jupiter Award. Locus Award
Arthur C. Clarke
   wrote   
The Songs of Distant Earth
1986
Brian Aldiss
   wrote   
Earthworks
1965 dystopian science fiction
Brian Aldiss
   wrote   
Helliconia Spring
First in the Helliconia Trilogy. BSFA winner, 1982; Nebula Award nominee, 1982; Campbell Award winner, 1983
Brian Aldiss
   wrote   
Super-Toys Last All Summer Long
Published in ' Super-Toys Last All Summer Long and Other Stories of Future Time'. The basis for the film A.I.: Artificial Intelligence
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
   wrote   
Herland
Utopian novel, 1915. The book describes an isolated society composed entirely of women who reproduce via parthenogenesis (asexual reproduction).
Clifford D. Simak
   wrote   
City
International Fantasy Award, 1952
Clifford D. Simak
   wrote   
The Visitors
1980
Clifford D. Simak
   wrote   
Way Station
Hugo Award winner, 1964
C. S. Lewis
   wrote   
Out of the Silent Planet
1st novel of a science fiction trilogy, followed by "Perelandra" and "That Hideous Strength"
David Eddings
   wrote   
The Losers
1992
David Gemmell
   wrote   
Legend
Best-seller. His first and most famous novel. First novel in the Drenai saga. Originally published in the USA as 'Against the Horde'.
Doris Lessing
   wrote   
Memoirs of a Survivor
Lessing won the Nobel Prize for Literature. A dystopian novel that was made into a film in 1981
Doris Lessing
   wrote   
Shikasta
Lessing won the Nobel Prize for Literature. It is the first book in her five-book Canopus in Argos series.
Douglas Adams
   wrote   
Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency
It is described on its cover as a "thumping good detective-ghost-horror-who dunnit-time travel-romantic-musical-comedy-epic". A radio adaptation was made by the BBC.
Douglas Adams
   wrote   
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
1979. Over 16 million copies sold.
Douglas Adams
   wrote   
The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
A 1988 humorous fantasy detective novel. Sequel to 'Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency'. A radio adaptation was made by the BBC.
Edgar Rice Burroughs
   wrote   
The Land That Time Forgot
1918 Caspak series. Made into movies in 1975 and 2009. His working title for the story was "The Lost U-Boat." The sequence was first published in Blue Book Magazine as a three-part serial
Edgar Rice Burroughs
   wrote   
A Princess of Mars
1917 The first of his famous Barsoom series. It is also Burroughs' first novel, predating his Tarzan stories.
Edgar Rice Burroughs
   wrote   
Tarzan at the Earth's Core
Simultaneously the 13th in his series of books about the title character Tarzan and the 4th in his series set in the interior world of Pellucidar.
Edwin Abbott
   wrote   
Flatland
Written under the pseudonym "A. Square", it offered pointed observations on the social hierarchy of Victorian culture. However, the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions.
Frank Herbert
   wrote   
Dune
1965. Winner of a Hugo Award and the inaugural Nebula Award for Best Novel. Dune is also the first bestselling hardcover science fiction novel, and is frequently cited as the best-selling science fiction novel in history.
Frederik Pohl & Cyril M. Kornbluth
   wrote   
Space Merchants
1952. Widely regarded as an SF classic
Frederik Pohl
   wrote   
Gateway
1977. Gateway won the 1978 Hugo Award for Best Novel, the 1978 Locus Award for Best Sci Fi Novel, the 1977 Nebula Award for Best Novel, and the 1978 John W. Campbell Award. It is the opening novel in the Heechee saga.
Frederik Pohl
   wrote   
Heechee Rendezvous
1984
Frederik Pohl
   wrote   
Man Plus
1976. Nebula Award winner
George Orwell
   wrote   
Nineteen Eighty-Four
Anti-utopian novel about human degradation in a totalitarian state
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
The First Men in the Moon
1901
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
The Invisible Man
1897 The original.
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
The Island of Doctor Moreau
1896
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
The Time Machine
1895 A classic.
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
The War of the Worlds
1898
Isaac Asimov
   wrote   
The Bicentennial Man
Hugo and Nebula Awards. Novella.
Isaac Asimov
   wrote   
Foundation
1951 The first book in Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy (later expanded into The Foundation Series).
Isaac Asimov
   wrote   
Foundation's Edge
1982. Hugo Award. Locus Award. Foundation series. Asimov also won the Best All-time Novel Series Hugo Award for the Foundation series.
Isaac Asimov
   wrote   
The Gods Themselves
1972. It won the Nebula Award & the Hugo Award for Best Novel.
Isaac Asimov
   wrote   
Pebbles in the Sky
1950. His first novel. Part of the Galactic Empire Series
Isaac Asimov
   wrote   
Robots and Empire
1985. Part of Asimov's Robot series.
James Blish
   wrote   
Black Easter
1968 Nebula Award-nominated fantasy novel. The sequel is The Day After Judgment. Together, those two very short novels form the third part of the thematic "After Such Knowledge" trilogy
James Blish
   wrote   
A Life for the Stars
1962. 2nd in Blish's most famous works, the "Okies" stories, known collectively as Cities in Flight, published in the science-fiction digest magazine Astounding Science Fiction.
John Wyndam
   wrote   
The Day of the Triffids
It established him as an important writer, and remains his best known novel.
J. R. R. Tolkien
   wrote   
Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring
The first in the trilogy. It started as a sequel to J. R. R. Tolkien's earlier work, 'The Hobbit'. A best-seller.
J. R. R. Tolkien
   wrote   
Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
The 3rd in the trilogy. A best-seller. The film adaptations of the trilogy were met with both critical and commercial success. Jackson's adaptations garnered 17 Oscars, 4 for The Fellowship of the Ring, 2 for The Two Towers, and 11 for The Return of the King; these covered many of the award categories. The Return of the King in fact won all of the 11 awards for which it was nominated, including Best Picture. With a total of 30 nominations, the trilogy also became the most-nominated in the Academy's history,
J. R. R. Tolkien
   wrote   
Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
The 2nd in the trilogy. A best-seller. The Lord of the Rings is considered to have had a great effect on modern fantasy; the impact of Tolkien's works is such that the use of the words "Tolkienian" and "Tolkienesque" has been recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary.
Jules Verne
   wrote   
Journey to the Center of the Earth
1864
Jules Verne
   wrote   
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
1870
Juliet Marillier
   wrote   
Son of the Shadows
The second book in the Sevenwaters Trilogy. Won the 2001 Aurealis Award.
Julian May
   wrote   
The Many Coloured Land
The first book of the Saga of the Exiles (or the Saga of Pliocene Exile in the USA). Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel
Kate Wilhelm
   wrote   
Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang
Hugo Award, 1977
Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
   wrote   
Cat’s Cradle
1963. Explores issues of science, technology, and religion, satirizing the arms race and many other targets along the way. The University of Chicago awarded Vonnegut his Master's degree in anthropology for Cat's Cradle. The book was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Novel
Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
   wrote   
Player Piano
1952. Vonnegut's first novel. The dystopian story takes place in a near-future society that is almost totally mechanised, eliminating the need for human labourers. Was later released in 1954 under the title 'Utopia'
Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
   wrote   
Slaughterhouse Five
1969. 'Slaughterhouse-Five; or, The Children's Crusade'
Larry Niven
   wrote   
The Integral Trees
1984 Nebula Award nominee, Locus SF Award winner, and Hugo nominee
Larry Niven
   wrote   
Ringworld
Hugo, Nebula, and Locus award-winner. Set in his Known Space universe and considered a classic of science fiction literature.
Lian Hearn
   wrote   
Across the Nightingale Floor
2002. Pen name of Australian Children's Author Gillian Rubinstein. set in a fictional world based on feudal Japan. The Tales of the Otori series have been sold into 36 countries and have been world wide best sellers. The series initially consisted of a trilogy: Across the Nightingale Floor, Grass for His Pillow, and Brilliance of the Moon. It was followed by a sequel, The Harsh Cry of the Heron, and a prequel, Heaven's Net is Wide.
Lian Hearn
   wrote   
Grass for His Pillow
2004. Part of the best-selling 'Tales of the Otori' series set in feudal Japan.
Lian Hearn
   wrote   
Heaven's Net is Wide
2007. Prequel to 'Across the Nightingale Floor' in the best-selling 'Tales of the Otori' series..
Lois McMaster Bujold
   wrote   
Barrayar
1991. Hugo Award winner, Locus Award winner, Nebula Award nominee
Lois McMaster Bujold
   wrote   
The Vor Game
1990. Hugo Award winner, Locus Award nominee
Margaret Atwood
   wrote   
The Handmaid's Tale
A feminist dystopian novel. won the 1985 Governor General's Award and the first Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1987, and it was nominated for the 1986 Nebula Award, the 1986 Booker Prize, and the 1987 Prometheus Award.
Michael Crichton
   wrote   
The Andromeda Strain
1969 Bestseller
Michael Crichton
   wrote   
Jurassic Park
1990. A bestseller and Michael Crichton's signature novel. Cautionary tale on biological tinkering. Dinosaurs are genetically recreated and run amok.
Michael Crichton
   wrote   
The Lost World
1995 Best-selling sequel to Jurrassic Park. Made into a movie.
Michael Crichton
   wrote   
The Terminal Man
1972 Made into a film of the same name.
Orson Scott Card
   wrote   
Ender's Game
1985. Numerous awards including the Nebula Award and Hugo Award.
Orson Scott Card
   wrote   
Speaker for the Dead
1986. Numerous awards including the Nebula Award and Hugo Award. Card is the only author to win both of American science fiction's top prizes in consecutive years.
Philip José Farmer
   wrote   
To Your Scattered Bodies Go
1971 Hugo Award
Philip K. Dick
   wrote   
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Nebula Award nominee, 1968. Basis for the film Blade Runner. Locus Poll Award, All-Time Best SF Novel before 1990
Philip K. Dick
   wrote   
Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said
1974 Hugo & Nebula Awards nominee. first prize in the John W. Campbell Awards for the best science fiction novel of the year in 1975.
Philip K. Dick
   wrote   
The Man in the High Castle
Hugo Award winner, 1963
Philip K. Dick
   wrote   
A Scanner Darkly
The semi-autobiographical story is set in a dystopian Orange County, California in the then-future of June 1994. It includes an extensive portrayal of drug culture and drug use. Winner of the BSFA Awards.
Philip K. Dick
   wrote   
The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch
1965 Nebula Awards nominee
Philip K. Dick
   wrote   
The Transmigration of Timothy Archer
1982. Nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1982
Ray Bradbury
   wrote   
Dandelion Wine
1957 Semi auto-biographical. Apollo 15 astronauts named a moon crater "Dandelion Crater" for Bradbury's novel.
Ray Bradbury
   wrote   
Fahrenheit 451
The title of Bradbury's book has become a well-known byword amongst those who oppose censorship
Ray Bradbury
   wrote   
The Illustrated Man
1951; short story collection
Ray Bradbury
   wrote   
The Martian Chronicles
1950
Ray Bradbury
   wrote   
Something Wicked This Way Comes
1962. Critics have praised Something Wicked This Way Comes as a classic of fantasy and horror
Robert Heinlein
   wrote   
Double Star
Hugo Award, 1956
Robert Heinlein
   wrote   
Job: A Comedy of Justice
Nebula 7 Hugo Award nominee. Locus Fantasy Award winner
Robert Heinlein
   wrote   
Methuselah's Children
1958 Prometheus Hall of Fame Award for "Best Classic Libertarian Sci-Fi Novel"
Robert Heinlein
   wrote   
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
Hugo Award, 1967
Robert Heinlein
   wrote   
Starship Troopers
Hugo Award, 1960
Robert Heinlein
   wrote   
Stranger in a Strange Land
Hugo Award, 1962
Robert Heinlein
   wrote   
Time Enough for Love
Nebula, Hugo and Locus SF Awards nominations
Robert Jordan
   wrote   
Crossroads of Twilight
10th book in the Wheel of Time series. #1 on NY Times bestseller list. It remained on the list for the next three months.
Robert Jordan
   wrote   
Knife of Dreams
11th book in the Wheel of Time series. #1 on NY Times bestseller list. The author dies before completing the series, it is to be commpleted by Brandon Snaderson. The series draws on elements of European and Asian mythology, most notably the cyclical nature of time found in Hinduism and Buddhism and the concepts of balance, duality and a respect for nature found in Daoism. It was also partly inspired by Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace.
Robert Jordan
   wrote   
The Path of Daggers
8th book in the Wheel of Time series. #1 on NY Times bestseller list. It remained on the list for the next two months. The title of the book is a reference to a Seanchan saying: "On the heights, the paths are paved with daggers."
Robert Jordan
   wrote   
Winter's Heart
9th book in the Wheel of Time series. #1 on NY Times bestseller list. It remained on the list for the next two months. The book's title is a reference to the increasing coldness of Rand al'Thor's personality and to the return of winter following the reversal in the previous book, The Path of Daggers, of the unnatural heat caused by the Dark One's manipulation of climate.
Roger Zelazny
   wrote   
Doorways in the Sand
1976. Nebula Award nominee; Hugo Award nominee, 1976
Roger Zelazny
   wrote   
Lord of Light
Won the 1968 Hugo Award
Roger Zelazny
   wrote   
Nine Princes in Amber
1970 Zelazny is probably best known for the Amber novels. This sis from the first series.
Roger Zelazny
   wrote   
Sign of Chaos
1987. Locus Fantasy Award nominee
Roger Zelazny
   wrote   
Trumps of Doom
Won the 1986 Locus Award (fantasy novel)
Stephen Donaldson
   wrote   
Fatal Revenant
Is the second novel by Stephen R. Donaldson in the best-selling four book series 'The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant'.
Stephen Donaldson
   wrote   
The Gap Into Conflict: The Real Story
The first book of best-selling 'Gap Cycle' series.
Stephen Donaldson
   wrote   
Lord Foul's Bane
The first book of the best-selling first trilogy of 'The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever'.
Stephen Donaldson
   wrote   
The Wounded Land
The first book of the best-selling second trilogy of The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever
Stephen King and Peter Straub
   wrote   
The Talisman
1984 fantasy novel. Although receiving mixed reviews the original hardbound edition spent 12 weeks as #1 on New York Times Best Seller List with a total of 23 weeks in total on the list. Publishers Weekly listed it as #1 for 11 weeks, with a total of 26 weeks on the list.
Stephen King
   wrote   
The Gunslinger
1982. The first in his best-selling Dark Tower fantasy/sci-fi series.
S.W. Ahmed
   wrote   
Dark Matter
Continues the long-standing tradition of "what if we could travel faster than light" in science fiction, mixing in theory on dark matter, alien abduction, and galactic warfare. A best-seller.
Terry Brooks
   wrote   
The Sword of Shannara
First book in the best-selling Shannara series. This novel became the first fantasy book ever to appear on the New York Times bestseller list, where it stayed for 5 months.
Ursula K. Le Guin
   wrote   
The Lathe of Heaven
1971. Made into TV movies, 1980 and 2002; Locus SF Award winner
Ursula K. Le Guin
   wrote   
Lavinia
2008. Locus Fantasy Award winner
Ursula K. Le Guin
   wrote   
The Left Hand of Darkness
1969
Ursula K. Le Guin
   wrote   
The Telling
2000. Locus SF Award winner. Endeavour Award winner
Ursula K. Le Guin
   wrote   
The Tombs of Atuan
1971. Newbery Medal winner
Ursula K. Le Guin
   wrote   
A Wizard of Earthsea
1968. The first in a series. Winner of the 1979 Lewis Carroll Shelf Award


Facts contributed by:


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