HomeFactopediaBrainoffsRankingsCommunityLog In
You know 0 facts


Poetry Opening Lines

Your overall rating on Poetry Opening Lines =
0%
Your best rally score on Poetry Opening Lines = 0 facts

Play Fact Master on Poetry Opening Lines    

Challenge Friends to a Brainoff on Poetry Opening Lines    

Play a Rally Game on Poetry Opening Lines    



125 facts:

'Abou Ben Adhem' by Leigh Hunt
   has the opening lines   
Abou Ben Adhem (may His Tribe Increase)...
Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace, And saw within the moonlight in his room, Making it rich, and the lily in bloom, An angel writing in a book of gold:- Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold...
'Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight' by Vachel Lindsay
   has the opening lines   
It is Portentous, and a Thing of State That Here at Midnight, in Our Little Town...
A mourning figure walks, and will not rest. 1879-1931
'Acquainted With the Night' by Robert Frost
   has the opening lines   
I Have Been One Acquainted With the Night.
I have walked out in rain-and back in rain. I have outwalked the furthest city light. 1875-1963
'Address to the Lord' by John Berryman
   has the opening lines   
Master of Beauty, Craftsman of the Snowflake...
Inimitable contriver, endower of Earth 1914-1917
'After All' by Henry Lawson
   has the opening lines   
The Brooding Ghosts of Australian Night Have Gone from the Bush and Town...
My spirit revives in the morning breeze
'After Apple-Picking' by Robert Frost
   has the opening lines   
My Long Two-pointed Ladder's Sticking Through a Tree...
Toward heaven still, And there's a barrel that I didn't fill. 1875-1963
'After Making Love We Hear Footsteps' by Galway Kinnell
   has the opening lines   
For I Can Snore Like a Bullhorn or Play Loud Music...
or sit up talking with any reasonably sober Irishman
'Against Women Unconstant' by Geoffrey Chaucer
   has the opening lines   
Madame, for You're Newefangelnesse...
Many a servant have ye put out of grace. Geoffrey Chaucer (1343-1400)
'Animals' by Robinson Jeffers
   has the opening lines   
At Dawn a Knot of Sea-lions Lies off the Shore in the Slow Swell Between the Rock and the Cliff...
Sharp flippers lifted, or great-eyed heads, as they roll in the sea. 1887-1962
'Annabel Lee' by Edgar Allan Poe
   has the opening lines   
It Was Many and Many a Year Ago, In a Kingdom by the Sea...
That a maiden there lived, whom you may know By the name of Annabel Lee;
'Autumn Rain' by Kenneth Rexroth
   has the opening lines   
Two Days Ago the Sky Was Full of Mares' Tails.
Yesterday Wind came, bringing low cigar Shaped clouds.
'Barbara Frietchie' by John Greenleaf Whittier
   has the opening lines   
Up from the Meadows Rich With Corn, Clear in the Cool September Morn...
Whittier, 1807-1892
'The Battle of the Baltic' by Thomas Campbell
   has the opening lines   
Of Nelson and the North, Sing the Glorious Day's Renown...
When to battle fierce came forth, All the might of Denmark's crown, And her arms along the deep proudly shone; By each the lighted brand, In a bold determined hand, And the price of all the land, Led them on.
'Bixby Canyon' by Allen Ginsberg
   has the opening lines   
Path Crowded With Thistle Fern Blue Daisy, Glassy Grass...
pale morninglory scattered on a granite hill bells clanging under grey sea cliffs. 1926-1997 major voice in American beat poetry
'A Blessing' by James Wright
   has the opening lines   
Just off the Highway to Rochester, Minnesota...
twilight bounds softly forth on the grass. 1927-1980
'Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind' by Shakespeare
   has the opening lines   
Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind, Thou Art Not So Unkind...
'The British Museum Reading Room' by Louis MacNeice
   has the opening lines   
Under the Hive-like Dome the Stooping Haunted Readers...
Go up and down the alleys. 1907-1963
'Bugle Song' by Alfred Lord Tennyson
   has the opening lines   
The Splendor Falls on Castle Walls And Snowy Summits Old in Story...
The long light shakes cross the lakes, And the wild cataract leaps in glory.
'The Burial of Sir John Moore After Corunna' by Charles Wolfe
   has the opening lines   
Not a Drum Was Heard, Not a Funeral Note...
As his corpse to the rampart we hurried; Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot, O'ver the grave where our hero we buried.
'Canto I' by Ezra Pound
   has the opening lines   
And then Went Down to the Ship, Set Keel to Breakers...
forth on the godly sea, and We set up mast and sail on that swart ship. 1885-1972
'Casey at the Bat' by Ernest Lawrence Thayer
   has the opening lines   
The Outlook Wasn't Brilliant for the Mudville Nine That Day...
The score stood four to two with but one inning more to play.
'Casey Jones' by Anonymous
   has the opening lines   
Come All You Rounders for I Want You to Hear...
The story told of a brave engineer.
'The Charge Of The Light Brigade' by Alfred Lord Tennyson
   has the opening lines   
Half a League, Half a League, Half a League Onward...
'Chicago' by Carl Sandburg
   has the opening lines   
Hog Butcher for the World, Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat...
1878-1967
'Christabel' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
   has the opening lines   
'Tis the Middle of Night by the Castle Clock...
And the owls have awakened the crowing cock;
Crossing the Bar by Alfred Lord Tennyson
   has the opening lines   
Sunset and Evening Star, And One Clear Call for Me!
And may there be no moaning of the bar, When I put out to sea,
'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth
   has the opening lines   
I Wandered Lonely As a Cloud...
That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, -A host, of golden daffodils,
'Daydreams for Ginsberg' by Jack Kerouac
   has the opening lines   
I Lie on My Back at Midnight Hearing the Marvelous Strange Chime of the Clocks...
And know it's midnight.
'Dirge Without Music' by Edna St. Vincent Millay
   has the opening lines   
I Am Not Resigned to the Shutting Away of Loving Hearts in the Hard Ground.
1892-1950
'Dover Beach' by Matthew Arnold
   has the opening lines   
The Sea is Calm To-night.The Tide is Full...
the moon lies fair Upon the straits. 1822–1888
'Dulce Et Decorum Est' by Wilfred Owen
   has the opening lines   
Bent Double, Like Old Beggars Under Sacks...
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge
'Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard' by Thomas Gray
   has the opening lines   
The Curfew Tolls the Knell of Parting Day...
The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea ...
'Epilogue' by Langston Hughes
   has the opening lines   
I, Too, Sing America. I Am the Darker Brother ...
They send me to eat in the kitchen When company comes... 1902-1967
'Evangeline' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   has the opening lines   
This is the Forest Primeval. The Murmuring Pines and the Hemlocks...
'Fergus Falling' by Galway Kinnell
   has the opening lines   
He Climbs to the Top of One of Those Million White Pines...
Set out across the emptying pastures of the fifties ... Born 1927, Kinnell lives and works in Vermont and New York City
'The Fiftieth Birthday of Agassiz' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   has the opening lines   
It Was Fifty Years Ago, In the Pleasant Month of May...
In the beautiful Pays de Vaud, A child in its cradle lay.
'Floating' by Kenneth Rexroth
   has the opening lines   
Our Canoe Idles in the Idling Current of the Tree...
And vine and rush enclosed backwater. Rexroth, 1906-1982
'For the Anniversary of John Keats' Death' by Sara Teasdale
   has the opening lines   
At Midnight, when the Moonlit Cypress Trees...
Have woven round his grave a magic shade ... 1884-1933
'Frog Autumn' by Sylvia Plath
   has the opening lines   
Summer Grows Old, Cold-blooded Mother...
The insects are scant, skinny. 1932–1963
'The Great One' by Tom Clark
   has the opening lines   
So Long Roberto Clemente, You Have Joined the Immortals Who've Been Bodysnatched
'Gunga Din' by Rudyard Kipling
   has the opening lines   
You May Talk O'gin and Beer when You're Quartered Safe out 'ere...
'The Hero and the Shortstop' by Charles Bukowski
   has the opening lines   
The Babe Would Get Drunk and Dangle Rabbit...
Out the 12th floor hotel window by his ankles. 1920-1994, Los Angeles poet was one of the most prolific and popular poets in the US in recent years.
'Hiawatha's Childhood' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   has the opening lines   
By the Shores of Gitchee Gumee,
By the shining Big-Sea-Water. (Lake Superior)
'How Do I Love Thee?' by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
   has the opening lines   
How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count the Ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
'Howl' by Allen Ginsberg
   has the opening lines   
I Saw the Best Minds of My Generation Destroyed by Madness...
Starving hysterical naked. 1926-1997 Beat poet
'If' by Rudyard Kipling
   has the opening lines   
If You Can Keep Your Head when All About You Are Losing Theirs...
And blaming it on you
'I Love a Sunburnt Country' by Dorothea Mackellar
   has the opening lines   
I Love a Sunburnt Country a Land of Sweeping Plains...
1885-1968 Australian
'Indian Serenade' by Percy Bysshe Shelley
   has the opening lines   
I Arise from Dreams of Thee in the First Sweet Sleep of Night
'i Sing of Olaf Glad and Big' by E. E. Cummings
   has the opening lines   
I Sing of Olaf Glad and Big Whose Warmest Heart Recoiled at War
1894-1962
'Jabberwocky' by Lewis Carroll
   has the opening lines   
'Twas Brillig, and the Slithy Toves...
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe ...
'Jerusalem' by William Blake
   has the opening lines   
And Did Those Feet in Ancient Time...
Walk upon England's mountains green?
'Knocked Up' by Henry Lawson
   has the opening lines   
I'm Lyin' on the Barren Ground That's Baked and Cracked With Drought...
And dunno if my legs or back or heart is most wore out
'Kubla Khan' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
   has the opening lines   
In Xanadu Did Kubla Khan A Stately Pleasure-dome Decree.
'The Lady Of Shalott' by Alfred Lord Tennyson
   has the opening lines   
On Either Side the River Lie Long Fields of Barley and of Rye
'Lament for the Two Brothers Slain by Each Other's Hand' by Aeschylus
   has the opening lines   
Now Do Our Eyes Behold The Tiding Which Were Told...
Twin fallen kings, twin perished hopes to mourn. 521BC-431BC
'The Landing of the Pilgram Fathers in New England' by Felicia Dorothea Hemans
   has the opening lines   
The Breaking Waves Dashed High, On a Stern and Rock-bound Coast.
And the woods against a stormy sky, Their giant branches tossed.
'The Last Words of My English Grandmother' by William Carlos Williams
   has the opening lines   
There Were Some Dirty Plates and a Glass of Milk Beside Her on a Small Table...
near the rank, disheveled bed ... (1883-1963), Williams was a practicing MD
'La Figlia Che Piange' by T. S. Eliot
   has the opening lines   
Stand on the Highest Pavement of the Stair-Lean on a Garden Urn...
Weave, weave the sunlight in your hair ... 1888-1965 Italian Title meaning "The Daughter who cries"
'Life in a Love' by Robert Browning
   has the opening lines   
Escape Me? Never Beloved!
Robert Browning (1812-1889)
'The Listeners' by Walter De La Mare
   has the opening lines   
'Is There Anybody There?' Said the Traveller...
Knocking on the moonlit door ...
'Living' by Denise Levertov
   has the opening lines   
The Fire in Leaf and Grass So Green It Seems Each Summer the Last Summer.
English/American, 1923-1997
'Lochinvar' by Sir Walter Scott
   has the opening lines   
Oh! Young Lochinvar is Come out of the West...
Through all the wide Border his steed was the best ...
'Looking Forward To Age' by Jim Harrison
   has the opening lines   
I Will Walk Down to a Marina on a Hot Day and Not Go out to Sea
'The Lotus-Eaters' by Alfred Lord Tennyson
   has the opening lines   
Courage!" He Said, and Pointed Toward the Land...
"This mounting wave will roll us shoreward soon.
'The Love Song' of J. Alfred Prufrock by T. S. Eliot
   has the opening lines   
Let Us Go Then, You and I, when the Evening is Spread out Against the Sky
'Lucy' by William Wordsworth
   has the opening lines   
She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways Beside the Springs of Dove
'Mandalay' by Rudyard Kipling
   has the opening lines   
By the Old Moulmein Pagoda, Lookin' Eastward to the Sea...
There's a Burma girl a-settin', and I know she thinks o' me
'Mending Wall' by Robert Frost
   has the opening lines   
Something There is That Doesn't Love a Wall
'Message' by Anselm Hollo
   has the opening lines   
Hello! I Am One of Your Molecules! I Started out from Crab Nebula
'The Man from Snowy River' by Andrew Barton "Banjo" Paterson
   has the opening lines   
There Was Movement at the Station, for the Word Had Passed Around...
That the colt from old Regret had got away... Australian Poet - February 17, 1864 - February 6, 1941
'Missa Defunctorum' by William Everson
   has the opening lines   
The Preacher's Coagulated Rhetoric Evaporates in His Teeth, Unretainable
'Missa Sanctorum' by William Everson
   has the opening lines   
The Sensuality of Women at Mass: That Deceptive Complaisance
'Nightpiece' by James Joyce
   has the opening lines   
Gaunt in Gloom, The Pale Stars Their Torches, Enshrouded, Wave.
James Joyce (1882 – 1941), most famous for his novel Ulysses (1922) was an Irish expatriate.
'Ode To A Nightingale' by John Keats
   has the opening lines   
My Heart Aches, and a Drowsy Numbness Pains...
My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk
'Old Space Cadet Speaking' by Anselm Hollo
   has the opening lines   
Let Me Tell You, the Captain Knew Exactly What He Would Do
'On This Day I Complete My Thirty-Sixth Year' by George Gordon (Lord) Byron
   has the opening lines   
T'is Time the Heart Should Be Unmoved...
Since others it hath ceased to move... Lord Byron (1788-1824)
'Ozymandias' by Percy Bysshe Shelley
   has the opening lines   
I Met a Traveller from an Antique Land...
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert... English Romantic poet (1792 – 1822)
'The Persistence of Song' by Howard Moss
   has the opening lines   
Although It is Not Yet Evening, the Secretaries Have Changed Their Frocks...
As if it were time for dancing 1922-1987
The Poet Is Dead by William Everson
   has the opening lines   
In the Evening the Dusk Stipples With Lights
A memorial for Robinson Jeffers
'Poppies in July' by Sylvia Plath
   has the opening lines   
Little Poppies, Little Hell Flames, Do You Do No Harm?
Sylvia Plath (1932 – 1963)
'Poppies in October' by Sylvia Plath
   has the opening lines   
Even the Sun-clouds This Morning Cannot Manage Such Skirts...
Sylvia Plath (1932 – 1963)
'The Portrait' by Stanley Kunitz
   has the opening lines   
My Mother Never Forgave My Father for Killing Himself...
especially at such an awkward time ... 1905-2006
'Postscript' by Seamus Heaney
   has the opening lines   
And Some Time Make the Time to Drive out West Into County Clare...
Along Flaggy Shore ... B. 1939, Northern Ireland; Nobel Laureate
'The Raven' by Edgar Allan Poe
   has the opening lines   
Once Upon a Midnight Dreary...
While I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore
'A Red, Red Rose' by Robert Burns
   has the opening lines   
O My Luve's Like a Red, Red Rose...
That's newly sprung in June ... National poet of Scotland, 1759-1796
'Relic' by Ted Hughes
   has the opening lines   
I Found This Jawbone by the Sea's Edge.
Edward (Ted) James Hughes (1930 – 28) was also a children's writer and wrote 'The Iron Giant'
Reveille by A. E. Housman
   has the opening lines   
Wake: the Silver Dusk Returning Up the Beach of Darkness Brims,
And the ship of sunrise burning Strands upon the eastern rims.
'Roll Call' by William Stafford
   has the opening lines   
Red Wolf Came, and Passenger Pigeon, the Dodo Bird...
All the gone or endangered came ... American poet and pacifist, 1914-1993
'Rosabelle' by Sir Walter Scott
   has the opening lines   
O Listen, Listen, Ladies Gay!
Soft is the note, and sad the lay, That mourns the lovely Rosabelle.
'Santa Filomena' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   has the opening lines   
Whene'er a Noble Deed is Wrought, Whene'er is Spoken a Noble Thought,
No haughty feat of arms I tell; Our hearts, in glad surprise, To higher levels rise.
'Scots of the Riverina' by Henry Lawson
   has the opening lines   
They Were Scots of the Riverina, and to Run from Home Was a Crime...
17 June 1867-2 September 1922
'Sea Surface Full of Clouds' by Wallace Stevens
   has the opening lines   
In That November off Tehuantepec,The Slopping of the Sea Grew Still One Night...
And in the morning summer hued the deck ... 1879-1955
'Seven Ages Of Man' by William Shakespeare
   has the opening lines   
All the World's a Stage...
And all the men and women merely players ...
'The Seven Sorrows' by Ted Hughes
   has the opening lines   
The First Sorrow of Autumn Is the Slow Goodbye Of the Garden...
Who stands so long in the evening ... English poet (1930-1998)
'The Shooting of Dan McGrew' by Robert W. Service
   has the opening lines   
A Bunch of the Boys Were Whooping It up in the Malamute Saloon...
The kid that handles the music-box was hitting a jag-time tune; Back of the bar, in a solo game, sat Dangerous Dan McGrew;
'The Signature of All Things' by Kenneth Rexroth
   has the opening lines   
My Head and Shoulders, and My Book In the Cool Shade...
And my body Stretched bathing in the sun, I lie by the waterfall(1905-1982), American poet and translator
'Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat' by T. S. Eliot
   has the opening lines   
There's a Whisper Down the Line at 11.39 When the Night Mail's Ready to Depart...
From Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats by T.S. Eliot
'The Soldier' by Rupert Brooke
   has the opening lines   
If I Should Die, Think Only This of Me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. Rupert Chawner Brooke (1887 – 1915)
'Solitude' by Ella Wheeler Wilcox
   has the opening lines   
Laugh and the World Laughs With You, Weep and You Weep Alone.
19th C. sentimental poet whose works with this exception are forgotten
'Song of the Tusk' by Anselm Hollo
   has the opening lines   
The Elephant Bogged Down Thousands of Years Ago, the Fragmentary Tusk Now in a Glass Case
'Sonnett XXV' by William Shakespeare
   has the opening lines   
Let Those Who Are in Favour With Their Stars of Public Honour...
And proud titles boast ...
'Southern Cross' by Jim Harrison
   has the opening lines   
That Hot Desert Beach in Ecuador,with Scarcely a Splotch of Vegetation...
Fronting as it does a Pacific so immensely lush... American poet and novelist
'Spring' by Gerard Manley Hopkins
   has the opening lines   
Nothing is So Beautiful As Spring-when Weeds,
in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush ... British, 1844-1889
'Sunset' by Rainer Maria Rilke
   has the opening lines   
Slowly the West Reaches for Clothes of New Colors...
which it passes to a row of ancient trees ... Austrian, 1875-1926
'A Supermarket in California' by Allen Ginsberg
   has the opening lines   
What Thoughts I Have of You Tonight, Walt Whitman...
For I walked down the idestreets under the trees with a headache self-conscious looking at the full moon.
'Thanatopsis' by William Cullen Bryant
   has the opening lines   
To Him Who in the Love of Nature Holds Communion...
with her visible forms, she speaks ... Bryant: 1794-1878
'The Theory and Practice of Rivers' by Jim Harrison
   has the opening lines   
The Rivers of My Life: Moving Looms of Light, Anchored Beneath the Log
'There Has To Be a Jail for Ladies' by Thomas Merton
   has the opening lines   
There Has to Be a Jail Where Ladies Go...
When they are poor, without nice things, and with their hair down, When their beauty is taken from them, when their hearts are broken ... (1915-1968), Merton lived as a Trappist monk
'This Is Just To Say' by William Carlos Williams
   has the opening lines   
I Have Eaten the Plums That Were in the Icebox...
American poet and pediatrician, 1883-1963
'Tired As I Can Be' by Lucille Bogan
   has the opening lines   
I Worked All the Winter and I Worked All Fall.
I've got to wait for spring to get my ahes hauled ... 1897-1948; written under the name Bessie Jackson
To Althea, from Prison by Richard Lovelace
   has the opening lines   
When Love With Unconfinèd Wings Hovers Within My Gates,
And my divine Althea brings To whisper at the grates; When I lie tangled in her hair And fetter'd to her eye, The birds that wanton in the air Know no such liberty.
'To Clemente in September' by Tom Clark
   has the opening lines   
Watching the Season Die on Television Makes Me Think of You, Roberto, in the End
'To the Cuckoo' by William Wordsworth
   has the opening lines   
O Blithe New-comer! I Have Heard, I Hear Thee and Rejoice...
O cuckoo! shall I call thee bird, Or but a wandering voice?
'To A Mouse' by Robert Burns
   has the opening lines   
Wee, Sleekit, Cowrin, Tim'rous Beastie...
O, what a panic's in thy breastie!
To a Waterfowl by William Cullen Bryant
   has the opening lines   
Whither, 'midst Falling Dew, While Glow the Heavens With the Last Steps of Day,
'Tract' by William Carlos Williams
   has the opening lines   
I Will Teach You My Townspeople How to Perform a Funeral
1883-1963
'Ulalume' by Edgar Allan Poe
   has the opening lines   
The Skies They Were Ashen and Sober...
The leaves they were crispèd and sere, The leaves they were withering and sere; It was night in the lonesome October
'Ulysses' by Alfred Lord Tennyson
   has the opening lines   
It Little Profits That an Idle King, By This Still Hearth...
... among these barren crags
'Venetian Air' by Thomas Moore
   has the opening lines   
Row Gently Here, My Gondolier, So Softly Wake the Tide...
Irish, 1779-1852
'The Village Blacksmith' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   has the opening lines   
Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree the Village Smithy Stands...
'The Waste Land' by T. S. Eliot
   has the opening lines   
April is the Cruellest Month, Breeding Lilacs out of the Dead Land
"mixing memory and desire, stirring dull roots with spring rain"
'Where Mountain Lion Lay Down With Deer' by Leslie Marmon Silko
   has the opening lines   
I Climb the Black Rock Mountain Stepping from Day to Day Silently.
I smell the wind for my ancestors ... Laguna Pueblo, American Indian
'Why We Don't Die' by Robert Bly
   has the opening lines   
In Late September Many Voices Tell You You Will Die. The Leaf Says It
'The Wood Pile' by Robert Frost
   has the opening lines   
Out Walking in the Frozen Swamp One Gray Day...
I paused and said, 'I will turn back from here. No, I will go on farther–and we shall see’. 1875-1963
'The Wreck of the Hesperus' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   has the opening lines   
It Was the Schooner Hesperus, That Sailed the Wintry Sea...
And the skipper had taken his little daughter,'To bear him company ...


Facts contributed by:


Allan R. Matthes








   About - Terms - Privacy Log In