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Fri 19 May #1 
chooky
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On April 25th 1999 the then Governor General Sir William Deane delivered a speech at Anzac Cove. Parts of this I personally found particular apt and memorable.

"For Anzac is not merely about loss. It is about courage, and endurance, and duty, and love of country, and mateship, and good humour and the survival of a sense of self-worth and decency in the face of dreadful odds. These were qualities and values the pioneers had discovered in themselves in what were, for Eurpoeans, the new lands of Australia and New Zealand. They were tested here and on the ancient battlefields of Europe for the first time in the Great War. They were not found wanting."

And then in closing -

"No one can express all that this day means to us Australians and New Zealanders. It is, said Australia's great historian Manning Clarke 'about something too deep for words'. But in the stillness of the early dawn, and in the silence that will settle once more along this shoreline, we feel it in the quiet of our hearts. The sense of great sadness. Of loss. Of gratitude. Of honour. Of national identity. Of our past. Of the spirit, the depth, the meaning, the very essence of our nations. And of the human values which those first Anzacs - and those who came after them - embodied and which we, their heirs must cherish and pass to the future"

For anyone just tuning in, the post date is a little late because one of the quotes originally appeared in another thread.
        




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Thu 25 May #2 
jmaxg
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As a soldier that has taken part in dawn services in locations like Kapooka (NSW), Adelaide (SA) and Melbourne (VIC), I can tell you that every time, you feel the weight of the fallen.

Being an agnostic (leaning towards atheism) does not excuse you. If you attend, you feel the sense of loss and the mourning that is still powerful after 102 years.

I advise ALL Australians and others that wish to experience it to check out the R&SL in that state to discover, and attend, a dawn service on April 25th. Same in New Zealand obviously.

After many years and a number of embarassing missteps, Australia and New Zealand's dawn service at Gallipoli on April 25th has come to be known as perhaps the most moving and powerful across the world. We are both, Australia and New Zealand, very proud of that. It wasn't our intention however. We simply wanted to go to the battlefield and pay our respects. But, unexpectedly, spiritualism grew from there.

Being spiritually moved does not require the presence of a god. Being spiritually moved requires the ability to look inward at yourself.




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Thu 25 May #3 
Helen McKenzie
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I have been involved in a few ANZAC Day services and i believe it is an experience not to be taken lightly and if anyone gets a chance to take part in one i would encourage you to do so. As jmaxg said it is a very spiritual and moving time.




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Fri 26 May #4 
chooky
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Just thought it worth mentioning that the reason Anzac Day 1999 stands out to me is that my mother had died less than two months earlier. She was a WRAAF & left the service to marry my dad. I remember her telling me that in those days (the 60s) women were automatically discharged from the Air Force when they married.
I took my three year old son to our local memorial.




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Fri 26 May #5 
sally906
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That is so lovely that you took your then 3 year old son.  My grandson was about 3 when we took him to a dawn service at elephant rock on Gold Coast. He, and all the other kiddies, was totally silent through the one minute silence. Was amazing - full silence - just waves crashing onto beach. Even the birds were quiet. 




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Sat 27 May #6 
jmaxg
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The Maneuver that soldiers do (England, Australia and New Zealand) relative to a rememberance party is called "rest on arms reverse".

That is the ceremonial process by which appointed soldiers present the weapon, reverse the weapon and then rests the weapon in deference to the deceased.

 




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