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Sat 17 Nov 18 #1 
chooky
Editor


Mohs Hardness Scale

The Mohs scale of mineral hardness was created in 1812 by the German geolologist Friedrich Mohs and is used to measure the relative hardness of minerals by their resistance to scatching. Simple though relatively imprecise compared to other scales, it is commonly used by gemologists and field geologists.


Apatite -- 5 -- Absolute hardness - 48

Calcite -- 3 -- Absolute hardness - 9

Corundum -- 9 -- Absolute hardness - 400

Diamond -- 10 -- Absolute hardness - 1500

Fluorite -- 4 -- Absolute hardness - 21

Gypsum -- 2 -- Absolute hardness - 3

Orthoclase feldspar -- 6 -- Absolute hardness - 72

Quartz -- 7 -- Absolute hardness - 100

Talc -- 1 -- Absolute hardness - 1    

Topaz -- 8 -- Absolute hardness - 200


Sample Qs :

X has a hardness rating of Y

Y is the hardness rating of X

Which mineral has a hardness rating of Y

 

Hope this isn't too many to put up at once - tried to pick what seemed to be an OK time to post (ie: not in the middle of a tournament) but will understand if it takes a while to check them out.
 




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Thu 29 Nov 18 #2 
Java
Factactrix

I thought that we had this one.  Added - thank you!




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Sat 1 Dec 18 #3 
chooky
Editor

Many thanks Java  : )




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